Friday, January 28 2022

It seems that every day brings some news of yet another cyber incident involving loss of data, assets and ultimately, loss of finances. As new laws and regulations regarding cybersecurity and data protection come into place, staying out of that circle of companies devastated by a cyber attack is the logical thing to do. Not only do companies want to stay out of the lurking media that is searching for the next big news report, but also to have a concrete plan to deal with a cyber incident as well.

Cyber Security Response Plan

It is a complex process to start, but once in the works, a solid cyber response plan (CRP) can make or break your business success. For that reason, companies are hiring record number of security personnel who are qualified enough and skilled to sort out the details and plan for a breach that is bound to happen sooner or later. Before diving deep into what the CRP should focus on, we must clearly define what exactly cyber security incident is.

A cyber security incident is a clear violation of one company’s wide range of cyber security policies that pose a great threat to computer systems and the entire information system. In other words, destroying, manipulating, invading, hacking or disabling any information systems that lead to negative impact to the company’s reputation, data and intellectual property can be classified as a cyber security incident.

In order to manage the widening and increasingly rising presence of cyber-attacks, a solid CRP needs to be put in place to protect the company from a severe reputational loss and avoid hefty fines from regulators.

So what exactly is a CRP? It is a comprehensive and systematic document that clearly defines methods, procedures and the approach to managing situations where a cyber incidents arise. The main purpose of the plan is to identify an incident, respond to it, contain the spreading, remediate the problem and eventually eradicate the threat actor altogether. The key to every successful response is determining the root cause of the incident along with lessons learned, in order to make sure the company doesn’t allow the same incident to occur twice.

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